PCSing to Korea (Part 2)

CONTRIBUTED BY TRISH
Read Trish’s super-duper PCSing to Korea, Part 1 HERE

OK, so now you have had a few days or weeks to process that you really are moving to Korea.
See, it’s not so bad. 
In fact you might just feel a little excited. 
Have you Googled how great the shopping is?
We will talk about that in a later post. Today we are going to continue talking about getting you here.

We talked a little about what to bring and what not to bring. 
Let me ask you a question:
What makes your house a home?
For us it is all the little things – the ‘guts’ of our house.
Pictures that we hang on the wall, games, favorite toys, bedding, and blankets we use to snuggle up on the couch with. 

Korea PCSing to Korea Part II 1.jpg
-- Koreaye.com

Korea PCSing to Korea Part II 2.jpg -- Koreaye
‘Our Crazy Wall’

Korea PCSing to Korea Part II 3
(Did I mention we have cement walls? Yes, some of our wall hangings are hung with Velcro and yes, you can see it when coming down the stairs.)

And my desk. I love my desk and didn’t feel I could move here without it. 

Korea PCSing to Korea Part II 4 -- Koreaye.com

Post will provide one desk per house and you can put in an exception to policy which is easy enough to do to ask for more desks.  We have 3 of these loaner desks – one for each child’s bedroom.

Korea PCSing to Korea housing -- Koreaye.com

Remember we talked about the couches? We brought ours. I wanted comfort this tour.

Korea PCSing to Korea on post housing--Koreaye.com

The other thing that makes our house a home is home cooking.  If you know me, you know I LOVE to cook.   So, I brought about ¾ of my kitchen stuff (I wish I culd have brought it all…..) which was the majority of my weight allowance!  No joke.   When bringing kitchen things you do have to keep in mind that the kitchen here is most likely smaller than what you are used to:

Korea PCSing to Korea on post housing kitchen

However there is surprisingly more room than what it looks:

Korea
housing kitchen storage.jpg

Remember the holidays.
Do you love to decorate for the holidays?
If so bring your holiday stuff!  I have 10 bins of Christmas in our storage area & I don’t care that it is cramped.  I like tradition. Do you fondue for New Year’s Eve?  Bring your fondue pot!  Do you have special baskets for Easter?  Bring the baskets!  If it is a tradition BRING IT.  Continue on as normal with family traditions – we have too many changes as military families as it is – continue on with traditions even if it means bringing an extra box of good that you will only use once or twice. You will be glad you did in the long run.

Where will I live?
Although there are always exceptions to everything, enlisted through 03 live in Hannam Village.
Everyone else will live on Yongsan.  O4/05 live in Burke Towers, Eagles Grove, Itaewon Acres or Blackhawk Village.  E9’s live in Watkins Ridge. 06’s live near the Helo Pad. GO’s live on the Hilltop.

Pets – I’m working with a friend on a post solely about bringing pets to Korea.  But just as a heads up:
Not everyone is allowed to bring pets to Korea.  Pets are not allowed at Hannam village or in Burke Towers.
Your orders must state that you are allowed to bring pets. The Dragon Hill Lodge does not allow pets. You must have a reservation at a kennel.  (I will have numbers and more information on this in the post on pets.)
All pets must have a microchip before coming to the Korea.  All pet owners are required to register their pets on post within 10 days of arriving on the peninsula. 

What happens when you arrive in Korea?  How do I get from the Airport to the Dragon Hill Lodge (if going to Yongsan)?  First off I hope you all have a sponsor.  Each family is supposed to have a sponsor, but sadly too many people don’t do their job correctly and many are left to fend for themselves.  If you don’t have a sponsor, ask for one, if you still don’t have a sponsor ask again.  Make some noise. :o)  

So, if you are traveling on the ‘wonderful’ Patriot Express you will arrive into Osan.  Once you exit the plane you will go through customs, which is super easy.  Then you will follow everyone out to the buses for Yongsan.  Put your luggage under the bus and hop on. You will have about an hour to an hour and a half drive (depending on traffic) to Yongsan.  When going through the gate at Yonsan the gate guards will come onto the bus to check IDs.  At this point you have about a 3 minute ride to the Dragon Hill Lodge. They don’t drop you off at the door, instead they drop you at the top of the hill where your soldier will go to a briefing and you will walk down the (very small) hill to the Dragon where you, the family member will check into the hotel.   **Remember if you want to go to the shoppette in the Dragon, take a copy of your orders and your ID card or they will not let you buy ANYTHING.

Get some rest; you have a few busy days ahead of you.

Welcome to the Land of the Morning Calm.

Kapshi, Kapshida!

8 thoughts on “PCSing to Korea (Part 2)

  1. Debbie George says:

    I have a off the wall question, where is the best place to buy the dishes you have? Do you call them blue & silver or blue & white? Thank

    Like

  2. Deedee J. says:

    My husband will be pcsing to korea in july 2013 and I was wondering is he allowed to bring his vehicle?

    Like

  3. Brena says:

    Do you know of anyone that has gotten an exception to policy approved to have more than two pets in on-base housing? Or is the only exception to policy you can file for excess pets is the ETP to move off base?

    Like

  4. Content Editor says:

    Editor’s Note: Due to technical difficulties this comment was not saved on our server. We are re-publishing it now to continue the conversation on this post.

    From Aileen on 9/26/13:
    “Hi we are moving in November and now I’m being told we can’t stay I hannam village. Anyone have this issue? I need some advice about furniture and more if someone can email me that’d would be great. Carogers0903@gmail”

    Like

Tell us your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s