Museum of Egyptian Art Munich

CONTRIBUTED BY SOPHIE LOUISE

Museum of Egyptian Art Munich Ushabtis | www.germanyja.comA trip to any new city is always a little bit disappointing if I don’t visit at least one museum. The first time I visited Munich, it was almost impossible to adhere to my own rule due to the huge number of museums and galleries I wanted to visit in just one short weekend. Eventually, I decided to visit the Staatliches Museum Ägyptischer Kunst (National Museum of Egyptian Art). This museum won above all the others though, because the entry fee on Sundays is only €1, and I have a mild obsession with Egyptian history.

A great thing about this museum is that you are allowed to take as many photos as you want, provided you don’t use flash or a tripod. The museum has a vast collection, with artifacts spanning from the Predynastic period, through to the Old, Middle and New Kingdoms. It even included Roman era mummy masks and the mummy of a Roman child, and several Coptic texts. Some of the statues on display were as tall as I am, and the collection included a great display of Ushabtis and canopic jars.

One of the most interesting artifacts was the piece from the Egyptian Book of the Dead. It’s difficult to appreciate the beauty of this because it is so big, you could stare at it for hours and still not see every detail. This is only a small section: it was too long to fit the entire piece in one photo.

Museum of Egyptian Art Munich Book of the Dead | www.germanyja.comIt wouldn’t be an Egyptian museum if it didn’t have a great collection of sarcophagi and death masks. It’s impossible to think of ancient Egypt and not have a classic sarcophagus spring to mind. Unfortunately, there were no mummies in these coffins! But the amount of detail and color in the decoration is breathtaking, and you are prone to forget that they are literally thousands of years old. The museum had coffins from each different period, so you are able to see the artistic and stylistic changes that occurred over time.

I went solo, but I would have gladly taken my eight year old nephew along with me! I think it would be a great place to take the kids for a few hours; it’s not too big but there is definitely enough there to keep them interested, especially this death mask for a Crocodile!

Museum of Egyptian Art Munich Crocodile death mask | www.germanyja.comConsidering not much else was open and the entry price was so cheap, I would have expected a museum as good as this to have been much busier than it was, but lucky for me it was quite empty. I had enough time to stand right in front of some pieces and read the all the information without feeling guilty for blocking someone else’s view. Which brings me to another winning point about this museum: the information about the artifacts is available in both German and English, which is not as common in museums as I would like! I highly recommend this museum for anyone with even a slight interest in Egyptian history. But even if you’re not that interested, it’s a great way to kill a few hours on a Sunday in Munich and learn about one of the most fascinating ancient civilizations in history.

Information:Museum of Egyptian Art Munich sarcophagus | www.germanyja.com

Museum of Egyptian Art Munich website

Address:

Gabelsbergerstraße 35, 80333 München

Public Transportation:

You can reach the museum using:

  • metro lines U2 and U8 (stop Königsplatz)
  • tram line 27 (stop Karolinenplatz)
  • bus line 100 (stop Pinakotheken)
  • all commuter rail lines (stop Hauptbahnhof)

The museum is about 10 minutes walking distance from the main train station (Hauptbahnhof).

Hours:

Closed Mondays (except Easter and Pentecost Mondays)
Tuesday – Sunday: 10:00-18:00 (9 AM –5 PM)
Evening opening on Tuesdays until 20:00

Entrance Price:

Adults: €7
Reduced: €5
Sunday: €1
Children under 18: free

Parking:

There are paid parking spots available in the streets around the museum.

Website:

http://www.smaek.de/

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